Review: 20th Biennale of Sydney

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Sydney Opera House. Picture: Will Yeoman

To explore the 20th Biennale of Sydney at any level — as connoisseur, as sight-seer, as flaneur — is to experience that dreamlike margin between reality and surreality in all its beauty and terror through the agency of art and some of the city’s most atmospheric sites. This year Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal has taken as her theme “The future’s already here — it’s just not evenly distributed”. Watch the video and read the story here.

Interview: Wendy Whiteley & The Secret Garden

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Wendy Whiteley in her Lavender Bay home. Picture: Jason Busch

Brett and Wendy Whiteley. They were Australia’s first superstar artistic couple, returning to Sydney in a blaze of glory after 10 years in Europe and Swinging Sixties London and New York, where they counted Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix among their friends. Back home, Brett would spend the next 20 years turning out masterpiece after masterpiece from the Whiteleys’ Lavender Bay home. Then it all started to fall apart… read the full story at The West Australian here

Concert Review: Reflection (Tura New Music)

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“One of the more ridiculous observations you hear about some contemporary classical music is: ‘It’s too abstract’. Well, sorry, but all music is abstract. What people really mean when they that is: ‘I only like what I know’. The genius of this superb final concert in Tura New Music’s Reflection tour, which over three weeks had embraced 11 localities in WA’s top end from Kununurra to Broome to Newman before coming to rest at UWA’s Octagon Theatre, was how it used this tension between the known and the unknown to such moving and meaningful effect.”

Read the full review at The West Australian here

Book Review: Feet to the Stars and other stories (Susan Midalia)

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“Like the best short stories, The Hook is both delicate and profound, setting individuals and their personal narratives adrift in the tumultuous ocean of a history that is continually being rewritten. And like the other stories in a collection thronging with different voices, different perspectives, different agonies — the title story and Oranges especially stand out for the precocious wisdom of their teenage protagonists — it creates a space for change simply to happen.”

Read the full review at The West Australian here